dirty-dirty-shisno
mylifeasaweapon:

trixter-jake-english:

gliber-t:

gaylienz:

redandblackbicycle:

Found this via reddit

finally something that treats introverts and extroverts as equals

The punctuation is even accurate holy shit

Freaking thank you. Being shy and being an introvert are not the same thing, as well as being obnoxious and being an extrovert.

The punctuation thing is right on, I’m such a ! It’s ridiculous


Obnok4lyfe

mylifeasaweapon:

trixter-jake-english:

gliber-t:

gaylienz:

redandblackbicycle:

Found this via reddit

finally something that treats introverts and extroverts as equals

The punctuation is even accurate holy shit

Freaking thank you. Being shy and being an introvert are not the same thing, as well as being obnoxious and being an extrovert.

The punctuation thing is right on, I’m such a ! It’s ridiculous

Obnok4lyfe

dirty-dirty-shisno
sjhetalia:

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

#NoNotAllWomen because women scholars have discredited this.  Female journalists have debunked the mythical “1 in 3 women” statistic that’s being passed around as fact.  The leading organization devoted to helping victims of rape is openly against the concept. Christina Hoff Sommers, a self-proclaimed equity feminist, exposed the flawed and deceptive methodologies behind the 1 in 4 and 1 in 8 rape figures. These “studies” are inflated to generate the government grant money women’s organizations depend on and keep the hysteria alive thus validating their feminist agenda.
A 2013 special report by the Department of Justice found that between 1995 and 2010 rape and sexual assault declined over 50%.
RAINN has officially stated that, “In the last few years, there has been an unfortunate trend towards blaming ‘rape culture’ for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campuses. While it is helpful to point out  the systemic barriers to addressing the problem, it is important to not lose sight of a simple fact: Rape is caused not by cultural factors but by the conscious decisions, of a small percentage of the community, to commit a violent crime." 
Wendy McElroy, an individualist feminist, wrote an article this month on rape cultureaccurately comparing it to Hitler’s big lie, concluding it by saying, “As a woman who has experienced genuine sexual violence, I ask one thing of the awareness month and the people promoting it. Tell the truth. Tell the truth to women and tell it about men. Those who use the big lie of ‘rape culture’ to promote their politics have more in common with rapists than they know; both use the pain and fear of women to their own advantage.”
KC Johnson wrote an article last month on rape culture, describing it as having 3 central characteristics: 
"First, it has received almost fawning press coverage (what media members want to be deemed pro-rape?)—allowing for transparently absurd allegations, such as those at Occidental, to be presented as credible. In some instances, this has come from the usual suspects, such as Kingkade at Huffington Post, Allie Grasgreen at Inside Higher Ed, and Richard Perez-Peña of the New York Times. But the phenomenon has also received extensive, uncritical attention in BuzzFeed, which despite its generally solid treatment of legal issues just hired the discredited Katie Baker to help coordinate its ‘rape culture’ articles. In a media too often accepts at face value a politically correct narrative on campus, the ‘rape culture’ claim is almost ideal for campus ‘activists.’
Second, the ‘rape culture’ approach allows activists to shift the narrative away from uncomfortable questions about due process and false accusations against innocent male students, and toward a cultural critique in which the facts of specific cases can be deemed irrelevant.Selena Roberts pioneered the tactic at Duke—when the case against the lacrosse players imploded, she (falsely) claimed that her guilt-presuming columns were merely designed to critique a flawed ‘campus culture.’ Or, as Amanda Childress implied in her oft-criticized remarks, whatever value might exist in following specified procedures in sexual assault cases, universities should focus their efforts on tackling broader cultural mores.
Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the ‘rape culture’ approach provides a weapon to advance a particular type of gender-based agenda (curricular and administrative priorities need to be revamped to recognize that women are victims) in a campus environment in which race/class/gender advocates already dominate.There always will be a stray, anonymous misogynistic comment on a message board, or by a drunken student at a spring-break party, from which advocates can then generalize to claim that a crisis exists on campus—without ever defining precisely what a ‘rape culture’ is, or how the steps they recommend could possibly eradicate it. And since there isn’t a recent example—from Duke to Dartmouth to any of the current Title IX claims—in which those who have cried wolf on campus have experienced any repercussions for their actions, there is no drawback in advancing inflammatory claims, no matter how unlikely.”
Men aren’t sharks, men aren’t russian roulette chambers, men aren’t mosquitos, men aren’t fucking poisoned m&m’s. Men are human beings who are capable of fucking up and doing horrible things JUST like everyone else.
~Prussia

sjhetalia:

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

#NoNotAllWomen because women scholars have discredited this.  Female journalists have debunked the mythical “1 in 3 women” statistic that’s being passed around as fact The leading organization devoted to helping victims of rape is openly against the conceptChristina Hoff Sommers, a self-proclaimed equity feminist, exposed the flawed and deceptive methodologies behind the 1 in 4 and 1 in 8 rape figures. These “studies” are inflated to generate the government grant money women’s organizations depend on and keep the hysteria alive thus validating their feminist agenda.

A 2013 special report by the Department of Justice found that between 1995 and 2010 rape and sexual assault declined over 50%.

RAINN has officially stated that, “In the last few years, there has been an unfortunate trend towards blaming ‘rape culture’ for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campuses. While it is helpful to point out  the systemic barriers to addressing the problem, it is important to not lose sight of a simple fact: Rape is caused not by cultural factors but by the conscious decisions, of a small percentage of the community, to commit a violent crime.

Wendy McElroy, an individualist feminist, wrote an article this month on rape cultureaccurately comparing it to Hitler’s big lie, concluding it by saying, “As a woman who has experienced genuine sexual violence, I ask one thing of the awareness month and the people promoting it. Tell the truth. Tell the truth to women and tell it about men. Those who use the big lie of ‘rape culture’ to promote their politics have more in common with rapists than they know; both use the pain and fear of women to their own advantage.

KC Johnson wrote an article last month on rape culture, describing it as having 3 central characteristics: 

"First, it has received almost fawning press coverage (what media members want to be deemed pro-rape?)—allowing for transparently absurd allegations, such as those at Occidental, to be presented as credible. In some instances, this has come from the usual suspects, such as Kingkade at Huffington Post, Allie Grasgreen at Inside Higher Ed, and Richard Perez-Peña of the New York Times. But the phenomenon has also received extensive, uncritical attention in BuzzFeed, which despite its generally solid treatment of legal issues just hired the discredited Katie Baker to help coordinate its ‘rape culture’ articles. In a media too often accepts at face value a politically correct narrative on campus, the ‘rape culture’ claim is almost ideal for campus ‘activists.’

Second, the ‘rape culture’ approach allows activists to shift the narrative away from uncomfortable questions about due process and false accusations against innocent male students, and toward a cultural critique in which the facts of specific cases can be deemed irrelevant.Selena Roberts pioneered the tactic at Duke—when the case against the lacrosse players imploded, she (falsely) claimed that her guilt-presuming columns were merely designed to critique a flawed ‘campus culture.’ Or, as Amanda Childress implied in her oft-criticized remarks, whatever value might exist in following specified procedures in sexual assault cases, universities should focus their efforts on tackling broader cultural mores.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the ‘rape culture’ approach provides a weapon to advance a particular type of gender-based agenda (curricular and administrative priorities need to be revamped to recognize that women are victims) in a campus environment in which race/class/gender advocates already dominate.There always will be a stray, anonymous misogynistic comment on a message board, or by a drunken student at a spring-break party, from which advocates can then generalize to claim that a crisis exists on campus—without ever defining precisely what a ‘rape culture’ is, or how the steps they recommend could possibly eradicate it. And since there isn’t a recent example—from Duke to Dartmouth to any of the current Title IX claims—in which those who have cried wolf on campus have experienced any repercussions for their actions, there is no drawback in advancing inflammatory claims, no matter how unlikely.”

Men aren’t sharks, men aren’t russian roulette chambers, men aren’t mosquitos, men aren’t fucking poisoned m&m’s. Men are human beings who are capable of fucking up and doing horrible things JUST like everyone else.

~Prussia

dirty-dirty-shisno

theironkeepsmebreathing:

mentalalchemy:

charlietimms:

Zheng Chunhui, a famous Chinese wood carver spent 4 years engineering this master piece from a single tree. Based on a famous Chinese painting “Along the River During the Quingming Festival” the carving echoes the daily life of the 12th century Chinese local. The level of detail is stunning!

Geez

This is fucking incredible

dirty-dirty-shisno

skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?

It all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.

You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 

But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.

Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!

Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen